The Nobel Prize...Phase 2!



     Our original Nobel Prize lesson went well and I needed the display space for other items.  So, I moved the display into the hallway and added some captions for others to use.   I'd love to know what you think!
Pat McFadyen
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The Nobel Prize...A Global Lesson



     Teaching students about the Nobel Prize is one of my favorite lessons!  They are really interested to learn why they may have heard about specific people.  It gives us a real back-and-forth conversation in which the kids can contribute as much as I can. 
     To capitalize on their interest, I created this classroom display, using lists from www.nobelprize.org.  I chose to go ahead and highlight the years when no prizes were given (generally World Wars 1 and 2 - but they had to figure that out!) and a few specific laureates, such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Madame Marie Curie.  I could have let them discover familiar names, but time was very short this week.   Students did have a chance to "browse" the lists in small groups.
     We also did a choral reading of a really good reading comprehension from www.edhelper.com that I use every year.  Then, we talked about why I had highlighted the areas mentioned above. 
     I hope to have time to let students pick a name to research very soon.  My goal is for my students to gain a global perspective that they can cultivate in the future.
 







Pat McFadyen
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Fact Family Bracelets...Stylish Learning!


     Learning basic math facts through "fact families" is the most efficient method, in my opinion, and develops number sense the best.  I have developed a journal program to teach, review, and support learning fact families.
     But, what can students do when they're not actively working on their journal or a focused activity?  My suggestion is...bracelets!  I developed printable sets for children to use.  They are a fun, portable, and social way to get extra practice!
     Prepare the bracelets by copying one set per child onto card stock and laminating.  Cut apart only as needed.  Tape the bracelet around the child's wrist.  Encourage your student to practice saying or writing the four related math facts each time they have a free minute.  Even better, encourage other teachers, administrators, volunteers to ask the child to share what the bracelet is about, at an appropriate time and place, of course.
     How encouraging for a child when the principal or other adult takes enough interest in what they're learning to stop and talk to him/her...based on the really cool bracelet!
     When the fact family is mastered, you can tape the bracelet into a math journal or onto a display board.  Then, on to the next bracelet!
     Enjoy and I'd love to hear how they work in your class!

Pat McFadyen
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Wash 'Em Up!


     I've always wanted to acquire the materials to demonstrate the importance of good hand-washing...and this year, I got them!  I ordered a small black light and the "germ juice" that glows under the light.  I used a swab to paint the juice on students' hands...that represents germs in our world.
Paint...
Glow...

Students then washed their hands as normal and came back to the light.  Missed places still glowed.
     Some students were pleased with their results, others were a little frustrated.  It did make a big impression on them all.
Oops...missed a spot!
I then chose 5 students and swabbed the fingers of the first student only.  He gave a gentle "high 5" to the next who did the same to the next, and on down the line.  The last student still picked up enough "germs" to glow.  A real learning experience all around!
Pat McFadyen
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Big Concept...Easy Display


     One of the foundational concepts of our science curriculum is...where do we get energy?  We can trace it all the way back to the sun!  I keep this small display up in the classroom all year and we refer to it often.  It really does seem to give students a "home base" from which to work.
     Do you have a small display that makes a big impact?  Share it with us!

Pat McFadyen
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